Your visual guide to overcoming barriers to progress

I didn’t find books and courses very practical. With HOW2s, I feel so much more confident now.

Edyta Jaszczyszyn Teacher and Manager
 

Evidence-informed teaching techniques

140+ unique, dual-coded explanations

HOW2s are step-by-step guides to teaching techniques. Unlike text or speech alone, the combination of still visuals and words means there is no need to figure out what to do.

Here are two steps extracted from a HOW2. Simple to follow, right?

Evidence-informed Teaching Techniques

Meet the HOW2s

Research shows that procedures are most effectively explained using a combination of still images and words. We’ve spent tens of thousands of hours applying this research to explain evidence-informed teaching techniques.

 

Look Inside

Nicolas Quentin, a teacher from Reading, UK, introduces the HOW2s and the teaching strategies they cover.

Barriers to Student Progress

Which barriers to student progress do you face?

Thousands of busy teachers are using HOW2s to overcome the barriers to progress they come across every day.

 

Professional Learning Solutions

HOW2s benefit everybody

Using HOW2s, every staff member can overcome barriers to progress.

Cost effective and effective

There’s a reason why all our secondary schools resubscribed this year.

HOW2s bridge the gap between knowing what the obstacles to student progress are and knowing how to tackle them.

One spend supports all your full- and part-time staff in learning and applying evidence-informed teaching in their classrooms. And it’s even more cost effective for MATs/groups of schools.

Download the ‘Samuel Ward Academy Trust’ case study

Get in touch to discuss how you can use HOW2s, find out about pricing and to schedule a free personal webinar.

Telephone
+44 (0) 1277 202812
Email
info@teachinghow2s.com

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Customer Comments

View Andy’s case study

 

Customer Comments

The universality of the images and the ideas they represent provides a focus for professional dialogue and for dialogue between teachers and students about what worked in the classroom.

Professor Kate Wall School of Education,
University of Strathclyde

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